A dying web, or a dead one?

App icons flying out of an iPhone

There have been billions of downloads

I saw in a recent article on Gizmodo that 6.3 billion Apps from Apple’s App Store have been downloaded in just over 2 years. It took 5 years for music downloads from iTunes to reach this level.  This works out to be around 17 million apps downloaded each and everyday.

At this rate, the number of downloaded apps is estimated to reach 13 billion by the end of this year, the same as the number of songs downloaded from iTunes by the end of the year.  The fact that apps are reaching this big number at twice the speed of music downloads is pretty remarkable.

As a result, I’m beginning to buy Chris Andersen’s article in Wired Magazine where he argues the Web is Dead. My brutal oversimplification of his argument is that the days of active surfing and engagement with the Internet where a user seeks out information is rapidly coming to an end.
As more and more people are migrating from the desktop browser experience to a mobile phone – from desk to pocket; more and more people are opting to select applications that do all the work for them.

The mobile medium simply isn’t conducive to yesterday’s typing, browsing and clicking on a big display at our desks.  With the rich assortment of thoughtfully designed apps available users are doing what comes naturally and following the path of least resistance.

So what does this mean for digital entertainment?

Look at the dozens of music apps that have sprung up on your mobile in your pocket to create resistance-free music experiences.

Take Pandora, Spotify, Last.fm, Y! Music, MOG, Rdio and others and you’ll see the music experience is different than just turning the radio on.
Just type in a song and relevant playlists are streamed to you – there is no need to download or pay for another song again.  While established artists like Lady Gaga are creating apps (LINK) to distribute gossip and new music, other musicians are marketing their stuff as “wrapping” in other interactive music-making apps like RjDj.

Needless to say, the music business is being challenged to create new models that must leverage apps.

In the video space, the battleground is the living room.  Embedded services in the form of Widgets are showing up in the new Internet-enabled TVs. Manufacturers like Samsung, Vizio, Sony, LG and others are leveraging either proprietary or Yahoo! Widget platforms to vie for your attention in the living room.

Netflix, surprise surprise, appears to be leading in the video app space.  However, a space that is ripe with opportunity seems to be in your pocket (that sounds unnecessarily gross – but you get the point).

Besides its TV and Internet enabled devices, Netflix’s Watch Instantly addition to the mobile app space allows viewers to stream from their queue (list of films) to enabled mobile devices.  They also just snuck on to the new Apple TV. Additionally, Apple TV’s Airplay will be interesting when in debuts in November bringing new ways to move video around the home.

Final thoughts

All of this activity points to the importance that the digital media business (namely studios and labels) create content apps that can bring content to wherever you may be, including both your living room and your pockets.

No matter where you are, it had better be as easy as clicking on an app icon and immediately delivering engaging and up to date content experiences.

Don’t you think?

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Comments on: "A dying web, or a dead one?" (117)

  1. Everything is changing so fast!! Please slow down!

    http://www.runtobefit.wordpress.com

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  2. My take-away from this post: Encourage my children to study app programing/creation and mobile media careers in their futures. With that much demand, careers necessarily will follow! 🙂

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    • Smart! But I would also encourage you to teach them to think beyond the now so they can learn to see what comes next.

      Like

  3. All of thsi technology makes my head hurt. But luckily, there’s an app for that.

    Great blog.

    Blessings,

    Ava

    Like

  4. Really Interesting 🙂

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  5. i agree…i have found myself on a few occasions to just pull out my ipod touch and just browse the internet from there while in bed. I do own a laptop and a desktop but it feels so effortless to just pull out this small piece of equipment and get things done, things such as comments on wordpress ; )

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  6. Mobile apps = lazy. Once there’s a major telecommunications crash we’ll see how dead the web is when people go into panic mode.

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  7. I agree with Mikalee’s comments above!

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    • I just thought of a Bible quote that might apply here:

      “Give a man a ‘fish’ (App) and you feed him for the day, teach a man to ‘fish’ (build App’s) and he’ll eat for a lifetime.”

      Like

  8. App use may be growing at a phenominal rate, but there are tons of people who still use ‘old-fashioned’ technology… and some people use both.

    I think the real end will be when Apps becomes the standard for business, rather than mainly for personal use.

    (Personally, I don’t waste money on App-based gadgetry. I have no need for them.)

    Like

  9. I really liked reading this blog post-a further question would be why are people ignoring primal instincts of going out and fending for ourselves-are our overall survival instincts changing to include laziness? This is good food for thought.

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    • Hmmm – I think as humans we are naturally wired to look for things that are easy and cause us no pain or effort…Most of us prefer that comfortable path of no resistance. Have you ever tried to get to the gym on a regular basis to so you can have that killer beach body? Well, I have, and it wasn’t a natural act…And it’s why I still prefer going to the movies 🙂

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  10. brunonasc said:

    This phenomenon was come earlier years, as the google came and gathered all the search engines … And with Web 2.0, little by little we are limiting our surfing to portals with all the information that interests us.
    As for mobile devices, I live in a “emerging” country (Brazil). Here the costs of data packets and cell phones makes it difficult to abandon the traditional google search …

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  11. So does that mean old fogies like me who does not have an iphone or any apple product will be left in the dust with our pencils and paper and desktops?

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    • He only mentioned Apple/iPhone as an example. They are not the only game in town.

      But, yes, unless you embrace the new you will be left in the dust with your pencils and paper just as the people who refused to embrace the desktop computing age have been.

      Change happens whether we like it or not.

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    • Quite the contrary – I believe that kids will look up to us old fogies who still like pencil and paper (even though I’m a tech geek, I still like to jot down the occasional note with pencil and paper), and look at us with awe and say: “How’d you learn how to spell?” Or, better, “How’d you learn to write so clearly?”

      [[For what it’s worth, I struggled with spelling “occasional” because I thought there were two s’es. Yikes.]]

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  12. the only problem with your analysis is that both Music and TV are now headed to dead end productions… they misy be made cheap and valueless to all but the most niche user…ala youtube. these media will be selling for pennies…thus. not much new will be made….i guess thats a “win” for those “few” who own the backcatalogs of stuff from 1950-2000….

    also GAMES are the only interactive/immersive media, and they need a device to play them beyond the phone screen…..or they cant charge 60 bucks a pop for Xbox or playstation.. pay for play- virtual objects?.maybe.. but even film tries to protect itself by forcing 3d into the theatres as a last gasp before ita all SNOOKIE all the time..:) — shell get payed very soon the same as she would at the salon…:0 if she dosnt like it, theyll be another orange jersey babe to take her place..no?:)

    but then again, even games will succomb to mass mediocrioty- farmvilles- as they split users in the niche…driven by facebook like stats that are now called “relatioships”:)

    lots of apps… not alot of value in them..? ok. just like websites…lol

    and BTW– WIRED is wrong much more than its right… ask them about VRML/ PUSH/ and how even snookie, with viacom fame/money/today. will pay her bills in 15 years…:)

    http://www.mediabastard.wordpress.com

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  13. signelect said:

    I like your blog post.I hadn’t realized this until now, i have download a bunch of apps on my phone and like Lanie says is mainly out of laziness because apps do make everything easier and access at a fast speed.

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  14. Ugh…my stomach hurts when things start to pass me by — and I am definitely not browsing on my phone yet. I’ve just started getting really comfortable with my computer! Grrr.

    And I’m still romantic about paper things like newspapers and books. I feel doomed to be left behind by my own generation.

    Crystal
    http://www.crystalspins.com

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    • I have three books in Kindle for iPad. I can read them anywhere and anytime I choose. I’m sure someone lamented the end of wood/stone and chisel. Ah, the feel and smell of cedar.

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    • It’s okay.. I have many apps in my smartphones to help me survive like map or cinema apps but I’m so sorry i dont help to save the wood, i still prefer paper things, e.g bible and books. 😀

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  15. BTW- what Anderson and Wolf really dont say..is that THEY are the one who left us all broke and with nothing left but the “transformation” they both huskstered.

    be careful when a people are broken, they either turn to being slaves.. or making someone else the slave.

    so much for all those ads in Wired…. btw- to really SEE the value of WIRED magazine… one could “see its thickness” go up and down over the last 20 years…

    how does one “see” that thickness on a blogsite?…its about as “transparent” as “server owner” allows.. no isnt it?:)

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    • Is it necessary for the reader to be able to see whether or not the thickness of the magazine (or blog) has changed? Does it matter if my favorite magazine is popular or not? Some of the beauty/health magazine I see in the library are as thick as encyclopedias.

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      • I think thickness relates more to the advertising that is being sold when it comes to print magazines and newspapers. When I see a magazine getting thinner, I know their revenue stream is breaking off and that is not a good thing.

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      • correct.
        my point is “honesty” of information. and whos paying for it and etc.

        the “love” of apps or “letting it do the work” will only assist in less transparent means to verify the real “value” of what you read/view/consume. etc.

        Whens the last time you “met” a Neilson Family:)? lol

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      • Nope, for me, as a consumer, it doesn’t matter how popular the stuff I read or listen to or watch is to other people. What matters is that it is relevant and meaningful to me.

        Now, as a content creator, that’s a different story. Thickness/traffic is a good measure of one’s “success.”

        Thanks for your comments!

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  16. I think that the reports of the web’s death are greatly exaggerated. True, the apps and other factors have caused a decline in the classic form of surfing. However, there is a significant difference between being dead and slowing down. To use a crappy analogy, the web can be seen as a middle aged person-slowing down, but not quite dead yet.

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  17. Great post. I totally agree with you about the opportunity being ‘in your pocket’. There are emerging technologies that are currently under development that will even go beyond just interacting with apps, though. Check out Pranav Mistry’s Sixth Sense Technology: http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/pattie_maes_demos_the_sixth_sense.html

    Smart devices, maybe even embedded in purses, jackets, hats, glasses, etc. will be location-aware and actively ‘engaged’ with the surrounding area. The devices will have face recognition, eye tracking, social network integration, and will absolutely be mini cash registers capable of directly purchasing a Starbucks coffee.

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    • Very interesting – all these devices, by the way, will enable the authors of these apps to create an absolutely incredible amount of very specific user data that will be used to tailor offers, promotions, etc. It’s remarkable how much Google gathers about us from just our web usage. Imagine what it will be like when we have these ultra-aware devices in nearly every single pocket – call it nook and cranny – of our lives. Cool or not cool? Hmmm. I feel a blog coming on – thanks for your comment.

      Like

  18. The WWW was a dumbing down from books and libraries, at least for most users. Apps are a further dumbing down.

    Where is this world going? 😦

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    • WWW is dumb but … well .. here you are posting on the WWW.

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    • Tom Barden said:

      The WWW isn’t a dumbing down tool, it’s a place where people can express their views, get noticed when normally they wouldn’t, have ideas noticed when normally they wouldn’t. A chance for a greater leap in innovation, App’s happen to be one of these ‘great’ innovations. Personally i don’t buy any of it, they are a waste of money, in my opinion as many of them probably get used for a day and then deleted (unlike facebook/twitter which are well used)

      Personally i hate App’s, i think they are a tool for the lazy people of this world, which seems to be the majority, unfortunately, however, i do understand that App’s have evolved a lot since they first arrived on the market place. I can see that they may lead to more innovations and i can also see something much better replacing them within 5 years.

      http://www/tombarden.wordpress.com

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  19. Aren’t a bunch of those downloaded apps just silly little games and “the level” app?

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    • Does it matter? That they are being downloaded is the point.

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      • Yes, i think it does matter. like you said, the web is not dead and mobile devices are becoming another, and probably one day soon, leading interface for electronic information. but substance and content do matter. so if all people are downloading is “the level” then why or how would this lead to the end of the web?

        I do have a mobile device – not an iphone and it is at least two year old technology, so I guess that I am limited with what I can do, but a few websites that have mobile device pages I do use frequently. the problem is, from what I have found, there are, at least for my tastes, only a handful of sites designed for the mobile browsers.

        Another problem are the overly complicated web-pages that currently exist. Ads, and other graphically heavy parts only slow down the loading of pages etc. so once the information is available as “the information I want to see” then I suppose I would be willing to move to more heavier use of mobile devices for my “web” experience. Until then, I think I can manage without “the level”.

        Or maybe I just don’t understand what these apps really are and are capable of. Feel free to enlighten me. or at least point me to a web page that I can learn more.

        Overall a very interesting blog and comments by all. what really is interesting is how reliant we have become of the web and getting the info we need when we want it. I have been in stores and have jumped online with other peoples iphones to research prices and reviews before I have made the purchase. what ever did we do before cell phones?

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  20. The web is not dying. It’s changing from a model where the browser was the only client to one where the browser is just another app.

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    • I would say that’s been going on for a while, what with RSS feeds, and e-mail clients. It’s just that Apple has shown a light on it with their several platforms.

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  21. i think that the apps have blown way past the music is due in part to that quite a bit of them are free, unlike the music

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  22. Oh man. I don’t even have a phone with the apps. What am I gonna do?? I don’t care. I don’t want to be like that. I’ll live happily with my radio, my tv, my computer, my books. So, I’m a dinosaur. I’ll be a happy dinosaur. But, I talk to live people!!

    evelyngarone.com

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  23. Sunflowerdiva said:

    I’ve been trying to teach my mom about technology and everything and so far only about 20% of what I’ve been telling her has gone in. Oh well. Technology is changing to rapidly it’s hard to keep up!!!

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  24. This really has nothing to do with the “web” dying. The internet is a part of life now and will only continue to evolve. The use of mobile devices only changes the way we access it. In fact, this incredible number of downloads only verifies the growth of the “web”.

    How does the author think all these apps communicate? Answer: The dying web.

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    • Indeed – you have a good point. The web really is the foundation layer, if you will, that provides the input for apps. Said differently, the dizzying amount of stuff out on the web provides the content for apps to organize and serve up to its apps users. Apps are really kind of like the Dewey decimal system, aren’t they? They organize the web for us in ways that are relevant to us. Thanks for your post!

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  25. I don’t really see how mobile apps can really replace the web at this stage – slow phone graphics, anemic processors, small screens and the low speed of mobile networks do not make mobile internet use a viable alternative to computer web browsing or application use. What I see mobile doing is filling a gap, that of ubiquitous internet availability during a normal day. As for music and television, after treating the Internet as an enemy, are now trying to embrace any technology that can possibly bolster failing industries.

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  26. I honestly don’t think that the web is dying. I understand that a lot of people use their phones but I also feel like people still evenly use their computers. I’m in college and here we have to be on our computers all the time. It isn’t convenient to pull out your phone to research a 20 page paper. My theory is that as long as people are in school and doing research the web will be existent.

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  27. I think the countless downloading of apps is being done by the 12-25 year old bracket and that a majority of those apps are games or apps of an entertaining nature. This would be a direct result of more and more people being less productive and spending more time trying to entertain themselves than trying to be a productive member of society. I see more and more people escaping to their gadgets instead of spending time with loved ones or giving back to their community. So are we reaching the point where technology has surpassed our humanity?

    http://search4divinity.wordpress.com

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  28. I’m old fashioned then I realized because I still web surf and work from the desk. I hate iPhones and phones like it they’re taking over everyone’s minds! I’m sick of going on Facebook and seeing that one of my friend’s status comments was uploaded from their stupid mobile phone. How lazy are we getting?

    Like

    • jrgames92 said:

      I agree with you greatly. I believe it is due to a lack of attention span and patience in people, that they must be always connected to the internet.

      Like

  29. jrgames92 said:

    Technology is evolving very fast these days. However, there is a world outside the internet, it is sad to walk around in public and see people hovering over their cell phones, as if it is their life support. I have nothing against the invention of “apps” or facebook/twitter and other communication websites, as they are great tools to the human race…but we must all learn to moderate our technology use with real life, and then we will acheive the best of both worlds.

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    • I agree – I saw this while traveling a couple weeks ago, airports are the worst … no one is watching where they are going.

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    • Tom Barden said:

      I also agree. Personally i think these App’s need to be used for a ‘truer’ purpose than just general public on facebook/twitter. I often feel that facebook could have been such a great tool for people and companies to use, but it seems to have lost its footing and, unfortunately, will never go back. It’s like that recent phase we have just got over the “like” pages. How much of a waste of time was that? If people translated the time they wasted doing such trivial things into more meaningful things, then the world could potentially be a much better place to live in.

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  30. Erin Lindsay said:

    This is becoming the information overload age. That is why I choose to eliminate some forms of technology. People think I am crazy for not having television, but I like to keep informed by reading or experience. I am already on the internet 12 hours of the day and carry around an android phone. Even then, I feel like it’s too much.

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    • That’s exactly right – you, much like those little apps out there, are filtering out all the stuff that don’t matter to you. And now you are living with a pared down lifestyle that suits you.

      And no, you are not crazy for not having a television. Would you believe my retired parents have at last count no less than 8 sets in their house? A little moderation would serve them well 🙂

      Like

  31. I simply can’t function without my beloved apps 😉

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  32. Congrats on your Well-Developed and Reader/User-Friendly Post!

    Oh, also on being Freshly Pressed. WELL DESERVED!!

    Thanks for the Insight and Views.

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    • Thanks so much for your kind and supportive words! I am totally shocked at the interest out there – please come back for more.

      I’m also at @thedigitalfool on Twitter – and getting started there as well.

      Like

  33. Agreed in oldfiet said.

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  34. My husband has an Iphone and after using it for three days I decided I need an Ipad..better screen size perfect for me. I am all for embracing technology, and to be really honest digital technologies have always been changing and evolving..striving to be better, faster, more convenient. But we still have libraries, I go to my local library every week. People still read books, be it on their Ipad or Ipod or a good old paperback. It hasn’t stopped writers from getting published, or singers from getting record deal..right?
    Why do people feel threaten by digital technology? I don’t romanticize the pre-digital technology era, I love my digi stuff :’)

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  35. Seems that things change so fast that it is almost impossible to keep up. I remember and worked on radios (sometimes call “blind tv”) that had very large glass tubes in them, and as the years went by the tubes got smaller and smaller, then so guy invented the transistor and the whole world changed. Then computers the size of large buildings. Then home computers (thought I would never fill up my first 40 meg hard drive) Now I have 1000 gig and looking for more. Apps just a small step ahead wait til you see what comes next.

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  36. I think we still browsing these days, and that shows that the web isn’t dying. The notion is that we browse in different way, and in this discussion, we use apps.
    I agree that apps limit our browsing according to what we believe as our preference. It is indeed a path of least resistance, and we can have things we like delivered directly to our handheld/pocket gadget. In this sense, the apps can limit us from alternatives we have not yet considered.

    Still, we still can browse directly in the web, if we choose to do so 🙂

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  37. The web is not dying but just changing.
    We have more portable applications and devices but websites and blogs
    are still the main core of intenet. This core is just slimmer than in
    the past but not weaker.


    http://www.galigio.org

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  38. Working in film animation & visual effects for film and TV, I use several extremely useful apps frequently.

    Prior to these digital tools, I had an awful lot of on-set paper/ pen/ script/ camera/ storyboard shuffling to do, often with need for an additional person to just keep track of stuff, as the pace is often fast and furious.

    Not saying the bulk of what’s available is useful as most, in my eyes, are akin to cotton candy- cheap, fun, consumed quickly and forgotten as the next shiny app arrives. The app’s with some life are the more useful tools, of which I’ll be hanging onto for years. Not so much death as it is progress.

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  39. I feel like I’m in a race constantly trying to keep up with all the new technology!

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  40. As much as apps have probably taken away from the web, I don’t think they will ever kill the web. As long as computers/desktops/laptops are around so will web surfing.

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  41. I dig whats going down here, but I must say, i believe that there will always be people who cruise the net. Its like reading, or listening to records. Except the capacity of a computer is so much more than a phone. I think cell phones are taking over a lot of the world, but there is a limit to the amount that one can do looking at a screen of that size.

    I’m a lifer. Unless something drastic happens like digital projecting screens from a phone that is as good as my LCD display, hooked up with an IR keyboard, combined with a video camera, and the processing power of a quad core, I wont be anywhere but in front of my PC.

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  42. the web won’t die, we are just finding different ways to use it

    shinyapples.wordpress.com

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  43. Great post.

    Although, I don’t think the rise of mobile apps and the like are killing the web, more than simpley spreading it out even further. Now you can start listening to an album, read an article or even edit a photo or song whilst mobile on your phone and then continue on when you reach your PC or Mac.

    Which is, of course, both a blessing and a curse. A blessing as it means that you can easily write down and procude that amazing idea as soon as you get it wherever you are, on the bus or in bed, but a curse as it means that you’re never disconnected from your work – which is vital!

    It will be interesting to see how this develops in the next few years.

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    • Indeed, apps are simplifying the crazy world of the web. It’s not going anywhere; rather, it’s transforming to something more user friendly.

      Thanks for your comment – please stay tuned for other blogs. I’ll be talking about stuff like this for sure.

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  44. One thing for sure, Apple have changed the way we live and changed our habits – basically overnight. Living in today’s ‘Information’ age, we are constantly given tools to make our lives really easy, tools so we become dependable on them, and eventually tools that dictate our actions and not the other way around.

    One thing is for sure – with the current development of highly sophisticated technology getting ever so small, it wont be long before we begin to debate ‘reality’. What is the real reality? On the space of becoming dependable – a young adult who I know personally managed to misplace their smart phone (iPhone) and for two whole days, his life basically came to a standstill. This is how much we are now dependable on technology.

    But coming back to this post, good article and good thought provoking questions. Its not long before your phone app will tell you when to eat and what to eat – if that does not exist already.

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  45. I think maybe the article only considered the youngest adults as well as teenagers, the same people who are champion speed texters. There are a couple of generations of internet users ahead of them who have been doing all this on a desk/laptop computer for 20 years and will continue to do it the long way. It’s a cultural thing.

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  46. This one totally got tweeted ! 😀

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  47. I recently blogged about this. (Specifically blogging as we know it.)

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  48. sadblonde said:

    It might be true that there is an increasing amount of people making use of iphone apps, but I disagree that this indicates an end to the information age. If anything, I think that the cellphone functions as an endorsement of a greater amount of internet browsing than ever before. Rather than being a replacement for a person’s home PC, the cellphone functions as the addict’s ‘go-to’ when they’re out and unable to reach their desktops. (Like a quick fix of sorts).

    As well, although you made mention of the increasing amount of applications being downloaded, you didn’t state if the number of websites being accessed is increasing or decreasing. I think both sets of statistics would have to be compared before making a judgment on whether the web is really dead or still alive and thriving.

    Like

  49. Hey thanks everybody for the great comments and starting some great conversations! And an even bigger thanks for getting the Fool noticed on Freshly Pressed – I am stoked with the unexpected attention…In the meantime, there’s much more to come – the RSS feed is on its way, and your comments have got me thinking about some follow ups.

    As they say, stay tuned….

    Like

  50. sayitinasong said:

    I think record companies are not keeping up and hanging on to the old formula of albums and drop dates etc etc.

    Like

  51. Barry Glibb said:

    I think apps are definitely ballooning and encroaching on the web (hadn’t really thought about them as two animals in a habitat until reading this piece), but I also think apps are still finding their way and settling into what roll they’ll play. I have an iphone, I love my iphone, I’ve downloaded hundreds of apps since getting it in the first 6 months, but now, after over a year, I pretty much just use 5 apps everyday and 10 other apps on
    ce a week and the rest sit there unopened unless I’m restless in an airport! So the usefulness of apps is still unclear, I think they will level out in popularity and there will still be space for Web, though it’s days as king certainly seem to be over.

    Like

  52. […] would be reduced to something less tangible, less real. The real kicker came when I stumbled upon an article about the death of the web. The post focused on the increased growth in the app market and how its presence and obvious […]

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  53. New school is cool

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  54. As a computer developer, I definitely see change in the consumer appetite and demand. From building webpages and websites, clients are requesting more smartphone apps.

    Furthermore, Steve Jobs has announced that the new version of OS X will have a Mac Apple Store (I’m assuming through iTunes). However, I wouldn’t go so far as to say the internet is dead. I think that there is and will be an equilibrium between app and webpage for a few years.

    I did appreciate your take on it though.

    http://www.switchedformat.wordpress.com

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  55. The Web is not dyind. Like technology, web is in a continuous change. I call it Progress.

    http://autospirit.wordpress.com/

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    • PTZ Camera – thanks so much for your inquiry. I’m not running ads just yet, but will definitely keep your note handy so that when I do you’ll be the first on my list to contact.

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  72. Very efficiently written story. It will be beneficial to anybody who employess it, as well as yours truly :). Keep doing what you are doing – looking forward to more posts.

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  73. Quite a few seriously beneficial knowledge in this article. I am not really sure whether or not you are aware or not but it does look like your footer is actually overlapping to some extent. Must be a little something inside the code not quite right. Anyhow, excellent website you have got here and you definitely can not beat wordpress for a Cms program.

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  74. woh I your blog posts, bookmarked ! .

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  75. Great what an idea!. Super post. Always remember you’re unique, just like everyone else.

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  76. Hello! Is it Okay if I ask something kind of off topic? I am trying to view this page on my iphone nonetheless it will not show up appropriately, do you may have any options? Thanks in advance!

    Like

    • You can get there two ways – 1) use Safari and navigate there just like you would on the internet and 2) search for the wordpress app (it’s free) and try getting to this page that way. Thanks for visiting!

      Like

  77. […] Apps have become an important feature when using our phones. Within two years more apps were download from iTunes than songs had been within five years of the launch.  But with apps becoming such a big part of our lives, is the web dead? […]

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  78. […] a follow-up to my first post – A Dying Web, Or a Dead One?, I recently found a staggering statistic about our world as it becomes more and more dominated by […]

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  79. 51. Generally I do not read post on blogs, but I would like to say that this write-up very forced me to try and do it! Your writing style has been amazed me. Thanks, very nice article.

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Savvy

Sleek, Smart, and About the PR/Media World Today

Gigaom

Technology news, trends and analysis covering mobile, big data, cloud, science, energy and media

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